University of South Alabama
 

XRCC1 as a Predictive Biomarker for Radiation Responsiveness in Patients with Prostate Cancer

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OPPORTUNITY

According to statistics from the American Cancer Society, in the United States, an estimated 54,000 (28,000 men and 26,000 women) will be diagnosed and about 43,000 people (22,000 men and 21,000 women) will die of pancreatic cancer in 2017. Pancreatic cancer accounts for about 3% of all cancers in the Unite States and about 7% of all cancer deaths. The average lifetime risk of pancreatic cancer for both men and women is about 1 in 65. Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with a 5-year survival rate of 7%. The best therapeutic options, to date, are surgery, combination cytotoxic therapies, and radiation therapy. Ideally, biomarkers would be available that would inform physicians on which patients would respond best to which therapeutic interventions.

 

BREAKTHROUGH IN TREATMENT OF CANCER

Inventors at the University of South Alabama have identified a polymorphic pattern of the gene XRCC1, which occurs preferentially in persons who are destined to respond well to X-ray therapy (XRT). This is based on data generated in a cohort of prostate cancer patients, treated with XRT for their cancer. Based on data reported by other groups, these changes in XRCC1 are associated with alterations in DNA repair, which would make a cell more susceptible to XRT. In addition, inventors have identified a polymorphic pattern of the gene XRCC1, which occurs preferentially in persons who are destined to not do well with XRT. This was identified in the same study of prostate cancer patients treated with XRT. Based on data reported by other groups, these changes in XRCC1 are associated with alterations in DNA repair, which would make a cell less susceptible to XRT.

 

COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES

•  Predict radiation therapy responders

•  Personalized cancer treatment

 

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY STATUS

Patent Filed

 

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Patent Information:
For Information, Contact:
Andrew Byrd
Director
University of South Alabama
andrewbyrd@southalabama.edu
Inventors:
Eddie Reed
Keywords: